2013 National Archaeology Day at the Arizona State Museum
The Roman Spectacle
AIA Tucson Outreach - The Greek Kiln
The Roman Spectacle
AIA Tucson Outreach - The Greek Kiln

Lecture Program

During the academic year, our society offers and co-sponsors a rich program of archaeological lectures. All lectures are free and open to the public. Below you can see the upcoming lectures for this semester. Please visit our Lecture Archive (under Lectures) for past lectures.

Statues and Stories: Hermaphroditus in Art and Ovid

January 28, 2014 - 5:30pm
Haury Room 216
Dr. Robert Groves, University of Arizona
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Out of the Dark: Lefkandi in Euboea after 1200 BCE

February 11, 2014 - 5:30pm
Haury Anthropology Building, Room 216
Dr. Irene Lemos, Oxford University
Dr. Irene Lemos will present a summary of the most important discoveries at the site, including those from the recent excavations under her direction.  She will also evaluate the data from Lefkandi to determine whether this site truly is the economic marvel it appears to be, or if it is the lack of other archaeological evidence from this period which makes Lefkandi seem so incredible.  
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Painting Helen in Classical Antiquity: The Invention of the Female Nude

March 5, 2014 - 4:30pm
Haury 215
Dr. Robert Sutton, Jr., Indiana University, Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI); Bryn Mawr College; AIA Philadelphia Society, President
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The View from Jezebel's Window: Recent Archaeological Excavation at Jezreel, Israel

March 11, 2014 - 4:00pm
Hillel Center
Dr. Jennie Ebeling, University of Evansville
JENNIE EBELING: ABSTRACT     The View from Jezebel’s Window: Recent Archaeological Excavations at Jezreel, Israel   The Jezreel Expedition is a multinational archaeological project in Israel sponsored by the University of  Evansville and the University of Haifa and directed by Jennie Ebeling and Norma Franklin. Strategically  located on the edge of the fertile agricultural land of Israel’s Jezreel Valley and along the ancient  international highway the Via Maris, Tel Jezreel was excavated for seven seasons in the 1990s by a team  from Tel Aviv University and the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem. The excavators unearthed  the remains of a large fortified enclosure on the tel that they dated to the 9th Ahab and Jezebel), primarily on the basis of the biblical evidence. However, many questions remained  about the history of occupation of Tel Jezreel and ‘Ein Jezreel, the nearby spring. In 2012, a team of  archaeology students from UE and staff members from the US, Israel and the UK conducted a landscape  survey of approximately 2.5 square km of “greater Jezreel” and recorded more than 350 features;  they include rock-cut tombs from various periods, modified caves, cisterns, grape and olive pressing  installations, quarries, and more. The results of this survey, combined with the data from a LiDAR (Light  Detection and Ranging) scan of 7.5 square km of the area, led the current team to open excavation areas  near the spring, on the edge of the tel, and in an agricultural area in between, in 2013. The team revealed  several phases of Early Bronze Age occupation close to the spring, and the remains of an impressive rock- cut wine press that may date to the Iron Age (biblical period). The Jezreel Expedition will return to the  field in 2014 for a four-week season and excavations will continue for at least three years beyond. century BCE (the reigns of
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City and City Planning in Arcadia

April 3, 2014 - 5:30pm
Haury Anthropology Building, Room 216
Dr. Anna Karapanagiotou, Greek Archaeological Service
ABSTRACT The city-state (polis), a principal form of social organization of ancient Greece, belonged until recently exclusively to the realm of historiographic research. In order to trace the birth of urban organization in ancient Arkadia, a mountainous region – isolated from the sea in antiquity – one should focus on Mantineia and Tegea, the two great city-states of eastern Arkadia. Mantineia, “most ancient and greatest polis of the Arkadian poleis” according to Polybius, constituted around the mid 6th century BC. a well-governed democratic state. The geographical position of Tegea, on the road leading to Sparta, determined the historical path of this flat and fertile land. The exceptional status of Tegea within Arkadia is divulged by Homer’s report that the Arkadians went to Troy under the leadership of the Tegean king Agapenor. In recent years excavations and new archaeological methods have shed light on the manner of establishment and evolution of these two great arkadian poleis in a decisive manner.
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News & Events

There are not any events currently scheduled, please check back soon!

The AIA Tucson Society has regurarly organized award-winning outreach projects. Starting in 2004, the Society won the first AIA Local  Society Incentive Grant to build a replica of a Greek kiln. In recent years, the Tucson Society won AIA outreach grants for the Roman Spectacle and the Roman Snacktackle! Please stay tuned for future outreach projects and feel free to join us!

Roman Spectacle

Since 2011, in a grassy arena on the University of Arizona campus, the Tucson Society of the AIA—a good organization whose members love the people—presented our first ever Roman gladiatorial spectacle of magnificent proportions! Following a cross-campus pompa (procession) of participants led by our beloved emperor (Caesar Whatshisfaceus), some solemn ceremonial and imperial largesse for the hoi polloi, the games began! Featured were ferocious beasts! barbarian warriors! heartless criminals! and as culmination, the combat of four pairs of matched gladiators! Truly did all in attendance enjoy the spectacle of Roman power and justice. Praise the emperor!

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Greek Kiln Project

The AIA Tucson Local Society was the first recipient of the Archaeological Institute of America's Local Society Incentive Grant. The Society is housed in the Department of History at the University of Arizona, with many of its members and officers working or studying on campus.

Funds were put towards the construction of a Greek kiln to educate and involve AIA members, local schools, and local artists in the techniques, making, and firing of Greek style pottery. Funding also supported a first firing. Studio and vocational artists were encouraged to participate and to share their expertise. The kiln has since been used as a fundraiser for subsequent firings. K-12 schools have the facility made available to them so that students can see and learn firsthand about this aspect of ancient cultures.

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Roman Snacktacle

Ever noticed that sometimes the delectables laid out for consumption at AIA Tucson lectures and events are fancier than the average cookie or cracker? Well, they often are (even if you haven't noticed). Want proof? Have a look at the following pieces of tasty evidence, prepared by Rosalva Parada, a UA graduate in Honors History and Classics.

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